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Mental Health and Psychosocial Support

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A newly published meta-analysis by Mukdarut Bangpan, Lambert Felix, and Kelly Dicksonentitled “Mental health and psychosocial support programmes for adults in humanitarian emergencies: a systematic review and meta-analysis in low and middle income countries,” has included a TFT research study by Suzanne Connolly and Caroline Sakai in their meta-analysis of therapies for adults after traumatic events in LMICs.

Of 12593 references from their initial search, the authors included only 35 studies that met the criteria for this meta-analysis. The article was published in the journal BMJ Global Health, and the lead author is a researcher at the University College London. This is the fourth important globally based meta-analysis that has included at least one TFT study.

The authors report that  “The evidence consistently shows that MHPSS (Mental Health and Psychosocial Support) programmes are effective in improving functioning and post-traumatic stress disorder.” 

They also mention that “TFT was designed for Rwandan Genocide survivors,” and was one of the studies reported to show positive effects for PTSD.  TFT was also reported to alleviate depression, as well as reductions in fear, anger and avoidance.  TFT was one of four studies (of 18 analyzed) that demonstrated a reduction in anger; and was one of only four studies where the intervention was delivered just one or two sessions for an hour or less per session. The TFT study also had a relatively large effect size.

This is one more acknowledgment of the effectiveness of TFT (and by extension, of meridian tapping) by objective researchers who have no ties to Energy Psychology.

Kudos and Congratulations to Suzanne and Caroline!

Click here to download PDF

More: https://gh.bmj.com/content/4/5/e001484

Significant Application of Thought Field Therapy Diagnostic in Practice

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Name of Authors: Yuriko Kawagishi

Contact information: Yuriko Kawagishi
Counseling Room KAKASHI
5-2-3-303 Sasaki Building, Suehiro, Chitose-city, Hokkaido 066-0027, JAPAN
Tel/Fax:+81-0123-22-3331
E-mail:kakashi@maroon.plala.or.jp
Homepage: kakashi.okoshi-yasu.com/

Brief Bio:

Yuriko Kawagishi is a clinical psychologist, a school counselor, and TFT advanced therapist and certified trainer. She runs the Counseling Room KAKASHI as a representative. She is vice-president of Japanese Association for Thought Field Therapy (JATFT). She is also engaged in social public support as an adjunct professor at the graduate school of Hokusho University, a member of a mediation committee at Tomakomai branch of Sapporo family court, council of Chitose Social Welfare, an executive director of the Hokkaido Society of Certified Clinical Psychologists, a member of the raising children committees in Chitose City and Ishikari City. She contributes herself to help the survivors from the Hokkaido iburi eastern earthquake happened in 2018.

Abstract:

Thought Field Therapy is efficient and effective tool to treat all kinds of psychological problems quickly in clinical practice. Especially as I work with clients with lower income, time and cost saving is significant for them. I introduce them TFT algorithm for beginning, and when the improvements are not enough, I add TFT diagnostic with muscle testing. Diagnostic is applicable even when clients do not realize their emotions. In my qualitative investigation of recent 21 clinical cases, I found these cases include shame, embarrassment, and anger or rage that may discourage them from talking how they feel. The diagnostic may be effective when clients have difficulties of telling or being aware of hidden emotions.

Introduction:

Thought Field Therapy (TFT) is non-invasive and non-verbal treatment technique developed by Callahan and eliminates psychological and physical distress in the specific thought field (Callahan and Trubo, 2001). TFT does not require clients talk about their problems that may cause more emotional pain and discourage them from continuing treatment (Morikawa, 2015 rev.) Researches about trauma treatment showed the significant improvements (Johnson et al., 2001; Folks, 2002; Sakai, Connolly, & Oas, 2010; Connolly & Sakai, 2011; Connolly, Roe-Sepowitz, Sakai, & Edwards, 2013; Robson, et al., 2016; Edwards and Vanchu-Orosco, 2017).

The diagnostic is the original form of the TFT treatment technique using muscle testing. The tester pushes the testee’s arm to determine the individualized tapping sequences in the specific order while he or she is tuning into the problem. Therefore even when clients cannot talk about what happened or how they feel, however, muscle testing can show us individualized tapping points with the specific order to treat their problems. TFT algorithms were developed as the tapping orders that yield approximately a 70-90% of success rate with statistical processing through muscle testing. (Morikawa, 2015 rev.).

In my practice as a clinical psychologist, I work mainly for population with low or no income. I make best efforts for efficient interventions to save their cost and time.

Objectives:

I usually use algorithms for beginning in my practice because algorithms have high success rate. However, I use the diagnostic following algorithms because it is more effective and more time efficient. In this study, I will explore qualitative aspects of TFT diagnostic applications in practice.

Methods:

I investigated the clients’ main complaints, main symptoms, backgrounds, first focus, applied algorithms, change in SUDs (subjective unit of distress), tapping sequence by diagnostic, change in SUDs, and comments and reactions in my recent 21 clinical cases.

Results:

All cases involved shame, embarrassment, anger, or rage through review in 23 of 24 cases. According to the client’s complaints, symptoms, or stories, the appropriate algorithms were applied, and the improvements of the SUDs indicated from 8.8 (SD=1.6) to 5.5 (SD=2.1) for 24 problems. Following the algorithms, diagnostic was applied while the clients were thinking about the problems or symptoms. The improvements showed from 6.1 (SD=2.6) to 1.3 (SD=1.5) for 32 focuses. Liver, middle finger, thumb, and PR points are not included in algorithms, but they were shown to be necessary for the treatment through muscle testing. The orders of tapping points were not exactly same as algorithms yet may include multiple algorithms. The average time of sessions is 1.7 times, and the average of diagnostic treatment time is 16 minutes.

It is hypothesized that shame, embarrassment, anger, or rage are emotions that may discourage clients from talking about their emotions or realizing their core problems. The diagnostic technique may be effective to address these emotions without requiring clients to verbalize. Moreover, the diagnostic may address associated issues or hidden emotions or trauma in the limited time of therapy session. The diagnosis gives the right tapping sequence and is more time saving than algorithm that may require to repeat the same patterns after correction of psychological reversals. It is more time and cost efficient technique in practice. These cases may include complex PTSD and low self-esteem, and the further study is necessary.

 

Citations:

Callahan, R. J., and Trubo, R. (2001). Tapping the Healer within: Using thought Field Therapy to Instantly Conquer your Fears, Anxieties, and Emotional Distress. Chicago, IL: Contemporary Books.

Connolly, S. M., & Sakai, C. E. (2011). Brief trauma symptom intervention with Rwandan genocide survivors using Thought Field Therapy. International Journal of Emergency Mental Health, 13(3), 161-172.

Connolly, S. M., Roe-Sepowitz, D., Sakai, C. E., & Edwards, J. (2013). Utilizing community resources to treat PTSD: A randomized controlled study using Thought Field Therapy. African Journal of Traumatic Stress, 3(1), 24-32.

Edwards, J. & Vanchu-Orosco, M. (2017). A Meta-Anaysis of Randomized and Non-Randomized Trials of Thought Field Therapy (TFT) for the Treatment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD): PRELIMINARY RESULTS, Association for Comprehensive Energy Psychology. 2017.

Folkes, C. (2002). Thought Field Therapy and trauma recovery. International Journal of Emergency Mental Health, 4, 99-103.

Johnson, C., Shala, M., Sejdijaj, X., Odell, R., & Dabishevci, K. (2001). Thought Field Therapy: Soothing the bad moments of Kosovo. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 57(10), 1237-1240.

Morikawa, A. (2015 Rev.). Thought Field Therapy Algorithm Training Manual. Tokyo: TFT Center of Japan.

Robson, R. H., Robson, P. M. Ludwig, R., Mitabu C., & Phillips, C. (2016). Effectiveness of Thought Field Therapy provided by newly instructed community workers to a traumatized population in Uganda: A randomized trial. Current Research in Psychology.doi:10.3844/crpsp.201

Sakai, C., Paperny, D., Mathews, M., Tanida, G., Boyd, G., Simons, A., Yamamoto, C., Mau, C., & Nutter, L. (2001). Thought Field Therapy clinical applications: Utilization in an HMO in behavioral medicine and behavioral health services. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 57(10), 1215-1227.

Sakai, C., Connolly, S., & Oas, P. (2010). Treatment of PTSD in Rwanda genocide survivors using Thought Field Therapy. International Journal of Emergency Mental Health, 12(1), 41-49.

The efficacy of a new self-training program of Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback and Thought Field Therapy to improve anxiety, insomnia, and quality of life

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Ayame Morikawa, PhD, Naoko Okamoto, PhD, and Iwao Yokuda, MA

Abstract

This study investigated improvements and impact of our new self-training program using Thought Filed Therapy (TFT) and Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback (HRVB) with HeartMath techniques designed to reduce anxiety and insomnia and improve quality of life. The program includes five two-hour workshops for two months and TFT and biofeedback self-training between the workshops. Ten participants with symptoms of anxiety or panic attacks attended the program. Trait anxiety ratings on the post-intervention administration of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) showed significant reduction in participants’ anxiety levels compared to pre-intervention ratings (P<0.01). Insomnia and Happiness Scale measures also indicated significant pre- and post-intervention changes (P<.05). Results of STAI administered at the two and a half months follow-up (n=8) indicated that improvements were maintained overtime. The researchers suggested that the new training may be a cost effective and time saving program for improving symptoms of anxiety, panic attacks, insomnia, and quality of life.

Introduction

Those who suffer from anxiety and panic attacks are increasing in Japan and are likely to depend on medication. Even though some are willing to have drug-free life, they may in fact depend on medication to alleviate anxiety about going outside, taking a train, and even terminating medication.

Thought Field Therapy (TFT) (Callahan, 1995) is an evidence-based approach to treat negative emotions and symptoms including trauma, depression, and anxiety by tapping on the meridian points of the body. The preliminary meta-analysis (Edwards & Vanchu-Orosco, 2017) showed significant improvements in trauma or PTSD symptoms across studies (Johnson, Shala, Sejdijaj, Odell, & Dabishevci, 2001; Folks, 2002; Sakai, Connolly, & Oas, 2010), including controlled studies (Connolly & Sakai, 2011; Connolly, Roe-Sepowitz, Sakai, & Edwards, 2013; Robson, Robson, Ludwig, Mitabu, & Phillips, 2016). Irgens and colleagues, in their randomized controlled study, suggested that TFT may have enduring anxiety-reducing effect (Irgens et al., 2012). In their study, they compared Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and TFT on effectiveness in treating agoraphobia and concluded that TFT as an alternative approach may be a more predictable and more time-efficient therapy than CBT.

Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback (HRVB) is accompanied by slowed respiration at a rate of 0.1Hz, which is thought to induce physiological coherence among the heart rate, blood pressure, and vascular tone (Vaschillo, Lehrer, Rishe, & Konstantinov, 2002; Vaschillo, Vaschilo, & Lehrer, 2004). HRVB has been shown to significantly improve not only medical conditions such as asthma, congestive heart failure, and hypertension but also posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, anxiety, fibromyalgia, and insomnia (McCraty & Childre, 2010; Siepmann, Aykac, Unterdorfer, Petrowski, & Mueck-Weymann, 2008).

As a part of their research at HeartMath Institute, McCraty and Zayas (2014) reported that positive emotions are independently associated with psychophysiological coherence which improves optimal cognitive functioning, emotional stability, and self-regulation. HeartMath technique is programed through the use of heart rate variability and heart rhythm coherence feedback training. Edwards (2015) emphasized that regular HeartMath practice enhances awareness of energy depletion, renewal and resilience in preparing for challenges as well as shifting and resetting feelings after challenges.

Objective

Through our clinical practice, we observed that an integrated approach of eliminating negative emotions and enhancing positive emotions, resilience, and self-regulation skills is effective for clients in overcoming anxiety and panic attacks. Based on our observations, we developed a new self-training program for those who want to be able to ride a train without panic symptoms. This new program utilizes a smartphone app and an ear sensor, offering self-help training in TFT tapping and HeartMath breathing techniques that help clients treat or alleviate their anxiety and any other associated symptoms by themselves. TFT is characterized by alleviating negative emotions and symptoms instantly and HeartMath program enhances individual’s resilience and positive emotions. Moreover, both self-help trainings may improve psychophysiological self-regulation. The objective of this study is to examine the efficacy of our new program.

Method

Ten participants included 8 females and 2 males, ranging from 31 to 67 years of age (M=49.8, SD=9.98). Among 10 participants, five were diagnosed with the panic disorder, three presented with anxiety, one was diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder, and one with depression. Two of them also presented with obsessive compulsive symptoms. Six of them were taking anti-anxiety and/or other medication prescriptions. The program was designed for two months, during which all participants were required to attend five two-hour workshops, where they learned TFT and HRVB step by step, shared their experiences and feelings and were able to ask questions and receive feedback. The participants were also engaged in self-training and exercises between the workshops. The instructor monitored their biofeedback data online and gave advice when necessary. The STAI (Spielberger, Gorsuch, Lushene, Vagg, & Jacobs, 1983), the Athens Insomnia Scale (Soldatos, Dikeos, & Paparrigopoulos, 2000), and the Happiness Scale (Sato et al., 1995) were administered to all participants in a pre- and post-intervention design to evaluate the effect of our new training program on their wellbeing. After two and a half months, STAI levels were assessed again as a follow-up measure.

Results

The trait anxiety levels on STAI post-intervention measure showed significant reduction from a pre-intervention mean of 52.8 (SD=9.3) to 40.7(SD=9.6), with the large effect size of 0.715 (Cohen’s d at P<.01). The results on both Insomnia and Happiness Scale indicated significant changes at 5% levels with medium effect sizes, d =0.46 and d =0.45 respectively. Insomnia ratings indicated significant symptom reduction from a mean of 8.8 (SD=3.2) to 3.9 (SD=2.6). The Happiness Scale results showed improvement in quality of life reports from a mean of 43.0 (SD=8.7) to 49.3 (SD=6.0). The STAI follow-up after two and a half months (n=8) revealed significant improvement compared to pre-intervention, from a mean of 54 (SD=9.2) to 41.6 (SD=7.1) (p<.01).There were no significant differences between post-intervention and the follow-up results on the STAI measure, means of 43 (SD=9.3) and 41.6 (SD=7.1) respectively.

Discussion

The findings of this study revealed that our new program is significantly effective in each of the dependent variables: trait anxiety, insomnia, and quality of life. As indicated by the results of STAI at the two and a half months follow-up, improvements in anxiety levels were maintained. Self-reports during interviews revealed that those who used anti-anxiety drugs prior to intervention successfully reduced or terminated the medication intake. One of the participants was successfully able to take a flight overseas without medication. Similarly, all of those who had been taking medication could get on busy subways in Tokyo with reduced medication or completely terminated medication regiment. The program is designed for the participants to explore their ability to change their psychophysiological states in workshops and to continue working on them at home with the biofeedback app as their personal trainer. The participants are able to continue their self-training after the program is over. The program may be time-saving and cost effective for both clients and therapists.

Reference

Callahan, R. J. (1995). A Thought Field Therapy (TFT) algorithm for trauma. Traumatology, 1(1).

Connolly, S. M., & Sakai, C. E. (2011). Brief trauma symptom intervention with Rwandan genocide survivors using Thought Field Therapy. International Journal of Emergency Mental Health, 13(3), 161-172.

Connolly, S. M., Roe-Sepowitz, D., Sakai, C. E., & Edwards, J. (2013). Utilizing community resources to treat PTSD: A randomized controlled study using Thought Field Therapy. African Journal of Traumatic Stress, 3(1), 24-32.

Edwards, J. & Vanchu-Orosco, M. (2017). A meta-analysis of randomized and non-randomized trials of Thought Field Therapy (TFT) for the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD): Preliminary results, presented at the Annual Meeting of the Association for Comprehensive Energy Psychology, San Antonio, Texas. Association for Comprehensive Energy Psychology, 2017.

Edwards, S. D. (2015). HeartMath: A positive psychology paradigm for promoting psychophysiological and global coherence. Journal of Psychology in Africa, 25(4), 367-374.

Folkes, C. (2002). Thought Field Therapy and trauma recovery. International Journal of Emergency Mental Health, 4, 99-103.

Irgens, A. C., Hoffart, A., Nysæter, T. E., Haaland, V. Ø., Borge, F.-M., Pripp, A. H., . . . Dammen, T. (2017). Thought Field Therapy compared to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and wait-list for agoraphobia: A randomized, controlled study with a 12-month followup. Frontiers in Psychology, 8, 1027. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2017.01027

Johnson, C., Shala, M., Sejdijaj, X., Odell, R., & Dabishevci, K. (2001). Thought Field Therapy: Soothing the bad moments of Kosovo. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 57(10), 1237-1240.

McCraty, R. & Childre, D. (2010). Coherence: Bridging personal, social, and global health. Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine, 16(4), 1.0-24.

McCraty, R. & Zayas, M. A. (2014). Cardiac coherence, self-regulation, autonomic stability, and psychosocial well-being. Frontiers in Psychology, 5: 1090. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2014.01090.

Robson, R. H., Robson, P. M., Ludwig, R., Mitabu C., & Phillips, C. (2016). Effectiveness of Thought Field Therapy provided by newly instructed community workers to a traumatized population in Uganda: A randomized trial. Current Research in Psychology, 5(1), 34-39. doi:10.3844/crpsp.2014.34.39.

Sakai, C., Connolly, S., & Oas, P. (2010). Treatment of PTSD in Rwanda genocide survivors using Thought Field Therapy. International Journal of Emergency Mental Health, 12(1), 41-49.

Sato, Takano, Kondo, Matsumoto, & Roozen (1995). ‘Manzokudo Scale’ was originally developed from ‘Happiness Scale’ retrieved from Happiness Scale” Meyers, R.J., and Smith, J.E. (1995). Clinical guide to alcohol treatment: The community reinforcement approach. (p.95). New York: Guilfor Press.

Siepmann, M., Aykac, V., Unterdörfer, J., Petrowski, K., & Mueck-Weymann, M. (2008). A pilot study on the effects of heart rate variability biofeedback in patients with depression and in healthy subjects. Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback, 33(4), 195-201.

Soldatos, C. R., Dikeos, D. G., & Paparrigopoulos, T. J. (2000). Athens Insomnia Scale: Validation of an instrument based on ICD-10 criteria. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 48, 555-560.

Spielberger, C. D., Gorsuch, R. L., Lushene, R., Vagg, P. R., & Jacobs, G. A. (1983). Manual for the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Palo Alto, CA: Consulting Psychologists Press.

Vaschillo, E., Lehrer, P., Rishe, N., & Konstantinov, M. (2002). Heart rate variability biofeedback as a method for assessing baroreflex function: A preliminary study for resonance in the cardiovascular system. Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback, 27, 1-27.

Vaschillo, E., Vaschillo, B., & Lehrer, P. (2004). Heartbeat synchronizes with respiratory rhythm only under specific circumstances. Chest,126,1385−1386.

 

Ayame Morikawa, Ph.D., is a psychologist and a chairperson of the Japanese Association for Thought Field Therapy (JATFT). She is a Voice Technology therapist and a Thought Field Therapy (TFT) trainer and the author of three books on TFT self-help. She is a Certified HeartMath Trainer and teaches Heart Rate Variability (HRV) biofeedback program. She has offered TFT training to more than 2,000 professionals and has been engaged in disaster assistance after earthquake, flood, and gun shooting in Japan. Dr. Morikawa started TFT Partner, the new program of humanitarian assistance using Community Reinforcement Approach. She received the Humanitarian Award of 2016 from ACEP. She also serves on the United Nations World Human Facility (WHF).

 

Naoko Okamoto, Ph.D., is a professor at the faculty of Comprehensive Psychology at Ritsumeikan University. She is a licensed clinical psychologist, art therapist, developmental psychologist, TFT advanced therapist, TFT trainer, and a certified HRV Breathing Coach. She is the author of numerous articles such as “A study on self-expression and interchange with others in group psychotherapy through group finger painting for university students“ and “The proposal for the notion of Dramism in psychotherapy as a key to seeking therapeutic meaning of expression”. She also is the author of many books such as “The meaning of drama in the context of clinical psychology” and “The standard of psychology”. Dr. Okamoto has an extensive clinical experience working at elementary, junior high, and senior high school levels as well as in a psychiatric hospital as a psychotherapist.

 

Iwao Yokuda, M.A., is a professor of Osaka Yuhigaoka Gakuen junior college. He is a licensed clinical psychologist, TFT advanced therapist, TFT trainer, and a certified HRV Breathing Coach. He is the author of numerous articles such as “A case study of bullying solved by cooperation with concerned teachers and the second grade junior high-school boy with problem behavior”. Mr. Yokuda has rich experience in the field of education and welfare, including provision of services as a psychological evaluator at a child guidance center, a school counselor at junior high and elementary school levels, and delivering counseling to students at a university. Currently, he teaches at the junior college and provides counseling to university students.

Recent evidence for effectiveness of TFT for treating PTSD

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Feinstein, D. (2008). Energy psychology in disaster relief. Traumatology, 14, 127-139. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1534765608315636

Sakai, C. E., Connolly, S. M., & Oas, P. (2010). Treatment of PTSD in Rwandan child genocide survivors using Thought Field Therapy.  International Journal of Emergency Mental Health, 12(1), 41-50.

Connolly, S. (2011). Brief Trauma Intervention with Rwandan Genocide-Survivors Using Thought Field Therapy. International Journal of Emergency Mental Health, 13(3), 161-172.

Feinstein, D. (2012). Acupoint stimulation in treating psychological disorders: Evidence of efficacy. Review of General Psychology, 16, 364-380. doi:10.1037/a0028602

Connolly, S. M., Roe-Sepowitz, D., Sakai, C., & Edwards, J. (2013). Utilizing Community Resources to Treat PTSD: A Randomized Controlled Study Using Thought Field Therapy. African Journal of Traumatic Stress, 3(1), 24-32.

CDs and DVDs on Thought Field Therapy®

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  • Callahan, R.J. (1997). Introduction to Thought Field Therapy®. La Quinta, CA: Callahan Techniques.
  • Callahan, R.J. (1995). Five-minute phobia cure. La Quinta, CA: Callahan Techniques.
  • Callahan, R.J. (1987). Stop smoking now! La Quinta, CA: Callahan Techniques.
  • Callahan, R.J. (1994). Love pain and other traumas. La Quinta, CA: Callahan Techniques.
  • Callahan, R.J. (2001). Stress, health, and the heart. La Quinta, CA: Callahan Techniques.
  • Callahan, R.J. (2009). Cancer and Thought Field Therapy® (MP3). La Quinta, CA: Callahan Techniques.
  • Callahan, R.J. (2009). The Miracles of Thought Field Therapy®: Cures for common phobias, addictions & traumatic situations (DVD). La Quinta, CA: Callahan Techniques.
  • Callahan, R.J., & Callahan, J. (2008). Introduction to TFT self-study course (Manual and MP3s of live event). La Quinta, CA: Callahan Techniques.
  • Callahan, R.J., & Callahan, J. (2009). Tapping the healer within: 8-week self-study course (manual and 9 MP3s). La Quinta, CA: Callahan Techniques.
  • Callahan, R.J., Edwards, J., Cowley, M., Milbank, C., (with Hanson, D.). (2006). Introduction to Thought Field Therapy®. La Quinta, CA: Callahan Techniques.
  • Callahan, R. (1997). TFT and heart rate variability: An interview with Fuller Royal, MD: The video. La Quinta, CA: Callahan Techniques.
  • Callahan, R. (1998). Causal diagnosis home study course. La Quinta, CA: Callahan Techniques.
  • Callahan, R. (2004). Stress, health, and your heart. (CD). La Quinta, CA: Callahan Techniques.
  • Callahan, R., & Callahan, J. (2003). Sensitivities, intolerances & individual energy toxins: How to identify & neutralize them with Thought Field Therapy® (DVDs and Manual). La Quinta, CA: Callahan Techniques.
  • Danzig, V. (1999). PET-TFT (DVD). La Jolla, CA: Author.
  • Sakai, C. (2008). ATFT Foundation post TFT treatment interviews with students and teachers (DVD). La Quinta, CA: Callahan Techniques.
  • Sakai, C. (2008). El Shaddai . . . Beyond genocide (DVD). La Quinta, CA: Callahan Techniques.
  • Sakai, C. (2008). Return to Rwanda: ATFT trauma relief mission (DVD). La Quinta, CA: Callahan Techniques.
  • Semmens, C. (2007). FearFix. (DVDs and CDs.) (www.fearfix.com)
  • Sise, M. (DVDs): Available at www.integrativepsy.com
  • TFT for Stress Management & Peak Performance
  • Transforming Trauma with Thought Field Therapy
  • Transforming the Trauma of the World Trade Center

Research on TFT

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  • Schwartz SA, Utts J, Spottiswoode J, Shade C, Tully L, Morris, W, and Nachman, G. A Study to Assess the Validity of Applied Kinesiology (AK) as a Diagnostic Tool and as a Nonlocal Proximity Effect. Proceedings, Parapsychological Association Meetings, 2009. Brit. Med. Jour. (in review, 2011). Presented as selected paper, Parapsychological Association annual meetings, Seattle, WA. 17 July 2009, and as a selected paper at the BIAL Foundation Conference, Porto, Portgugal. 8 April 2010.

Books in Which Offshoots of TFT are Mentioned

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  • Grodner, B.S., & Reid, D.B. (2010). Permanent habit control: Practitioner’s guide to using hypnosis and other alternative health strategies. New York, NY: Springer.

Research on TFT upper

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  • Fifty teenagers who had been orphaned 12 years earlier in the Rwandan genocide received a single session of TFT. Their scores decreased significantly on a checklist of PTSD symptoms that was completed by their caretakers and a self-administered checklist of PTSD symptoms. They experienced reductions in symptoms related to PTSD and maintained the improvements a year later.

Research on TFT lower

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Sakai, C.E., Connolly, S.M., & Oas, P. (2010). Treatment of PTSD in Rwandan child genocide survivors using Thought Field Therapy. International Journal of Emergency Mental Health, 12(1), 41-50.

Pasahow, R.J. (2009). Energy psychology and Thought Field Therapy in the treatment of tinnitus. International Tinnitus Journal, 15(2), 130-133.
(This article contains two case studies in which Thought Field Therapy was found to be effective in treating anxiety and depression symptoms in participants who were suffering from tinnitus.)

Schoninger, B., & Hartung, J. (2010). Changes on self-report measures of public speaking anxiety following treatment with Thought Field Therapy. Energy Psychology: Theory, Research, and Treatment, 2(1).

Articles on TFT

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  • Bray, R. (2007). Thought Field Therapy: Working through traumatic stress without the overwhelming responses. Violence & Abuse Abstracts, 13(4).
  • Dujany, R. (1997). Un attento studio delle emozioni. Medicina Naturale, 6, 30-32.
  • Sakai, C. (2010). A smile after the storm. Psychotherapy Networker, 34(6).
  • Wiseman, R. (2010). Tapping away your bad memories. The Daily Mail, Monday, July 12. Retrieved from http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-1293914/Can-really-erase-lifes-traumatic-events-memory-tapping-fingers.html
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